Ramblings

A blog of trivial facts and nothing news

Linda Ronstadt

 

 

LR

 

Who didn’t like Linda Ronstadt back in the 1970’s? That woman could sing, I remember listening to her when I as a young man of seventeen. I can still remember her belting out “You’re no good, you’re no good, you’re no good, Baby, you’re no good ” But that isn’t my point. This young lady had a great depth of  talent. One of Ronstadt’s first early musical influences was Mexican songs that her father taught her and her siblings. Before her career was over she would go back to those roots. She eventually went to college and  ended up performing with the Stone Ponies. By the end of the 1960’s, Ronstadt had become a solo act producing several albums before landing on the charts with Heart Like a Wheel in 1974. The album had several hits, including “You’re No Good” and “When Will I Be Loved.” The recording went platinum selling more than one million copies. Ronstadt quickly became one of the great musical superstars of the 1970’s. It was in the later 70’s when I heard her on the radio.  Looking back on those days I thought she was younger rather then being in her late 20’s. Linda Ronstadt  proved to be more than just a girl rocker.  She has been called the most versatile singer of her generation, a talent who could master rock and country and mariachi. In the 1980’s, Ronstadt tried her hand at pop standards and she also went back to her Hispanic heritage  by recording a Spanish-language album, Canciones de Mi Padre(1987), which was filled with traditional Mexican songs like the ones her father loved. I had just heard her song “You’re no good” on the radio recently and I was surprised to hear that she had Parkinson’s disease and she had lost her singing voice. Although we cannot condone everything she may have done in the past you still have to tip your hat to her for her talent and ability.

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One thought on “Linda Ronstadt

  1. kane lorde on said:

    The most gorgeous voice. Rock, country, standards, mexican tunes her voice was an instrument of beauty, power and heartbreak. They don’t make ’em like her no more.

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